Pearce

Supporting the future of British farming is central to everything we do at Asda. After all without British farmers we can’t bring you top quality British food, including great British meat.

And, as part of this commitment to the future of farming we regularly support Agricultural shows across the country.

These shows are at the centre of promoting good British food to the general public and are a great place for farmers and consumers to mix and learn from one another.

One of the shows we support is the English Winter Fair which happened last weekend. It’s a primestock show, where farmers show their livestock, competing to see which animals will produce the best meat for Christmas.

Our involvement at the show centres on the next generation of farmers and stock people as we sponsor the young handlers competitions. These classes are all about encouraging young stock people to display their talents and ability in handling cattle and presenting to be judged at a show.

Showing cattle isn’t as easy as some people may think and the talent these youngsters showed in their classes is a sure sign that we’ve got some great
young farmers coming through the ranks to form the next generation of farmers able to supply you with the best quality British produce.

The winner of the young handlers champsionship was 14 year old Melissa Donaldson from Yorkshire. She was a clear winner and a great advocate for the future of farming.

Posted by Pearce on 22 November 2011
Chris

Free range Bronze turkeys are extra special and this year as well as the fields to roam in they have been able to graze a special crop. The farmer planted mustard to encourage the ranging of the birds and give them a richer environment.

Posted by Chris on 29 November 2011
Pearce

Wal Mart held a summit to examine best practice on sourcing from small farmers. The meeting was hosted by Wal Mart Central America in Costa Rica. Costa Rica is a small country with a population of 4 million.

Costa Rica

There is a thriving agriculture. Costa Rica has a large number of volcanoes some of which are still active. The cultivated land is based on volcanic ash and the soils are very fertile. They are also free draining. Just before we arrive they had had 10 days of consecutive rainfall and over one metre of rain had fallen.

Vegetables were the principal crops with a rotation of potatoes, carrots, onions, cabbage (red and green) and maize.

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Posted by Pearce on 28 November 2011
Pearce

Costa Rica is famed for its coffee. This is fiercely protected. There are two varieties of coffee; Arabica and Robusta.

The Costa Rican Government permits the cultivation of Arabica. No Robusta is permitted.

The pictures show the coffee beans on the plant which is very attractive with its bright green leaves.

The ripe (red) beans are harvested and the bean separated from the pulp. These are dried into the green form prior to roasting according to the customer’s preference.

The enthusiasm of Costa Ricans for coffee was very evident. Standing in front of a supermarket display (looking like a confused tourist), I was assisted by several local each with their view on which was the best coffee and hence which I should be buying.

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Posted by Pearce on 28 November 2011
Chris

ASDA is introducing the Bourbon Gold turkey for Christmas. This is a unique bird specially bred for us.

Posted by Chris on 29 November 2011